Summary vs Paraphrase vs Quote

The Differences between Quoting, Summarizing, and Paraphrasing

Research plays a huge part in any writing project because this is how you can present information and strengthen your own arguments. As you complete research, you will want to keep track of any sources you examine and be sure to give credit to sources that you do use. There are three main ways of using outside information: quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing.

Quote Summary Paraphrase

Quoting

A direct quotation is one of the most common methods of integrating sources into your work. In a direct quote, you are presenting information from the source material word-for-word. It is best to use this method when you have a specific passage from the source that makes an impact or gives a strong opinion you can focus on.

All direct quotes need quotation marks around them. In addition, they need in-text citations at the end. The formatting of the in-text citation after the direct quote may vary depending on the formatting style you are using. Here are some examples:

APA Formatted Direct Quote:

According to APA: The Easy Way, “Always provide appropriate credit; otherwise, it is considered plagiarism” (Houghton, 2009, p.9).

MLA Formatted Direct Quote:

According to APA: The Easy Way, “Always provide appropriate credit; otherwise, it is considered plagiarism” (Houghton 9).

Summarizing

APA Formatted Direct Quote:

APA: The Easy Way provides an overview of all aspects related to APA formatting. In Part One, the authors provide guidance on how to utilize the features of Microsoft Word for formatting, how to format levels of headings, in-text citations, tables, and avoiding plagiarism (Houghton, 2009).

MLA Formatted Direct Quote:

APA: The Easy Way provides an overview of all aspects related to APA formatting. In Part One, the authors provide guidance on how to utilize the features of Microsoft Word for formatting, how to format levels of headings, in-text citations, tables, and avoiding plagiarism (Houghton).

Paraphrasing

APA Formatted Direct Quote:

(Houghton, 2009).

MLA Formatted Direct Quote:

According to APA: The Easy Way, “Always provide appropriate credit; otherwise, it is considered plagiarism” (Houghton).

 

References

Houghton, P., & Houghton, T. (2009). APA: the easy way!. Flint, Mich.: Baker College. – in APA formatting

Lorenzen, Gretchen, and Shawn Lorenzen. MLA Easy Formatting Style Writing And Grammar Guide. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012. – in MLA formatting

Jenny Mark

Jenny Mark is a graduate of California State University of San Bernardino and lives in Southern California. She is a part time professor for Baker College, Southern New Hampshire University, Vista College, and Baker College. She teachs composition, creative writing, and essential college skills. Check out her blog at http://jennysuemark.com

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